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20121201
20121231
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STATION
CNBC 18
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English 18
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18
CNBC
Dec 5, 2012 3:00pm EST
been a resurgence of developed markets, europe particularly, and investors who left that market, that's been a great place to be for the last few months. there's so much focus on fiscal cliff. i think that's very hard to do on a day to day basis. for multiasset portfolios, the rest of the world is a good story right now. >> because we're so dominated by these issues in washington. rick santelli, some enthusiasm going on in these markets today with the anticipation of perhaps a deal. do you buy into it? is that what you're seeing in chicago? >> first of all, there are many expecting a deal. down in chicago, we don't just hope for a deal, we hope for a reform-oriented deal. to just do a deal without tagging it to reform is just going to make more of the same at some future date. the treasury complex really, really unfazed by just about all of it. briefly, we're under a 158 yield. haven't been there since second week in november. after 815, 118,000 jobs, interest rates were never as high as they were before that number. that really set part of the stage for treasuries. >> and you guys do
CNBC
Dec 6, 2012 3:00pm EST
? >> not necessarily. we would stay with dividend payers. we would also dip our toe into europe into some very high-quality, multicountry stocks there. mostly on consumer discretionary stocks as well. >> george, we haven't forgotten you yet. scott, i have a question for you. just noticed today france and germany's stock markets hit 52-week highs. we're still wringing our hands over the debt crisis, and the equity markets are hitting new highs for the year. is it too late to get into those markets? >> i don't think so, bill, at all. all the european markets are up for the year except portugal, which is up slightly. even greece is up year to date. i don't think you're too late on that trade at all. in fact, i think, quite frankly, the structural changes that are happening in europe could produce growth for many years come. >> where are you putting money to work, george? >> the fiscal cliff is sort of the uncertainty du jour. people are always worried about next uncertainty. you need to blow past that and think about where the next good stocks going to be, how can i invest, how can i participate? taxe
CNBC
Dec 10, 2012 3:00pm EST
cheaper? europe. >> germany and france at two-week highs last week. >> there's a few countries over there. i like the relative value there. they've got a printing press. they're going to open that. what i learned is you don't fight the tape and don't fight a bailout. i've got about 30% off this country -- outside of this country. and added 10% in emerging markets. now i think that we've had a bloodless revolution again in china, i think it's a great place. look at emerging markets. better value while you wait around. >> and they've done well over the last year. it was just they've been the silent gain. you haven't quite realized they've been doing so well. >> i like it. i wouldn't rush into anything. if you hid cash on the side, what a good time getting in. >> this market has stopped reacting on a minute by minute basis to all the prognostications out of washington on the fiscal cliff. what do you make of that? are we becoming complacent? are we immune? what are you talking about on the floor? >> we just had the president speak. nothing there. china numbers tomorrow. then germany. maybe n
CNBC
Dec 20, 2012 3:00pm EST
means i.c.e. will be clearing its equity trades in europe. this deal will not face regulatory scrutiny with the way that this is formed. the former deal attempts with deutsche boerse fell and here there was no overlap between i.c.e. and nyc. however, this clearing agreement makes it very tough and expensive to break up this deal between nyc and i.c.e., so the question market sources are asking now is what is the next move for cme group, nasdaq, hong kong exchange, among others? let's talk about when,deal and what it all means right now. scott, this is part of the deal that's really being underreported and not spoken about too much. that's the clearing exchange partnership. that's going to make it very tough to penetrate and to get any competitors to break up this deal. >> officials all over the globe who are assessing this deal and trying to figure out what they are going to do next to try to remain competitive. joining us now are david faber, bob pisani and steven guilfoyle and rick santelli at the cme. first, david, who broke the story this morning, i guess this deal had to happen ba
CNBC
Dec 14, 2012 3:00pm EST
done very good so far. >> that's interesting, because europe has taken a back seat to many soft other issues. you still worried about europe? should that be part of our investment idea portfolio? >> as david said, that's improved dramatically, too, and it's really taken a back seat, so i would say, as david said, that some type of deal is priced into the market. >> let's do it this way. your single best idea to invest in, and then i'll get yours. >> financials, not necessarily the big banks but bank of new york melon. >> why? >> a processing bank, because it's the cheapest sector. a lot of momentum going for it right now. >> even the low rate that hurt their bottom line because it's tough to lend and borrow at such low rates. >> keep in mind, bank of new york melon, they are a processing bank so lending is not that big a deal to them. >> profit, production and personal income are the three things to watch, the three ps. >> what's your single best? >> our single best idea is apple computers. >> still? >> yes, and johnson & johnson? >> they are barbell. >> down 9 out of the last 11 week
CNBC
Dec 17, 2012 3:00pm EST
is going to be, fiscal cliff going into the end of the year, we'll start to focus on europe and japan printing money over there. we'll get back into the macroeconomic horizons and see how it goes. but yeah. i think there's been some outflows in certain sectors, risk is on here. >> all right. bill nichols how are you playing this waiting game right now? >> i think one of the real interesting sectors one of the guests mentioned is the action in financials. you look at bank america and you haven't seen any real participation in the financial sector for four or five years. that's one to keep an eye on. you may see a meaningful move. that could be good for the market. >> you don't think it's too late -- >> -- next year in terms of a tax increase. >> bank of america is the best performing this year. it's not too late to get into that? you think there's more to come? >> look at the short-term move and it looks good. look at a five or six year chart and it's a different story. looks like you've got more room on the upside. >> rick santelli, jump in here. what are you seeing in chicago the mov
CNBC
Dec 18, 2012 3:00pm EST
canal that made our world a smaller place. we supported the marshall plan that helped europe regain its strength. and pioneered the atm, so you can get cash when you want it. it's been our privilege to back ideas like these, and the leaders behind them. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping people and their ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. ♪ can i still ship a gift in time for christmas? yeah, sure you can. great. where's your gift? uh... whew. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. ship fedex express by december 22nd for christmas delivery. . >>> what i care about is reducing the deficits. we'll investigation pleasive growth in the country. >> how high will this market go in the face of the fiscal cliff? >> so bad they are actually good. j.c. penney and groupon have been miserable stocks this year, and their ceos are both in the running for herb greenberg's worst ceo award of 2012 which he'll bring you live. could there be more upside for these troubled names? let's talk number
CNBC
Dec 19, 2012 3:00pm EST
, stabilization in europe and the u.s. at 2.7% gdp growth is a little stronger to handle this, so that's why i think you want to be buying on this. >> everybody wants to buy. so many people -- you want to be bullish, but these guys in washington, and gals in washington, give you so little reason to actually be bullish. you're right. the corporate sector you know, loaded with cash, fundamentals turning positive. >> but this is the big difference from last year, last summer where the economy was so fragile. we were in such a fragile state last suggest so it was easy to tip us over. now we're a little better here in the states but a lot better in china, and a little bit better in europe. >> we've got to get to jim. >> because of the contrarian view, jim, is once we get a deal, we sell right into the deal. >> yeah, that's right. i'm going tonight skunk at the garden party here, and i'm geg going to tell you i never thought we'd get a deal. throwing rocks at each other. more likely we won't get a deal. the economy is as bad as last summer, looking at 1.5% growth for the fourth quarter, maybe the sa
CNBC
Dec 11, 2012 3:00pm EST
job. >> the new year just around the corner, and while our next guest expressed concern for europe in 2012, this year his focus for next year is now on the united states. just what should investors expect, you ask? >> let's ask ethan harris who joins us with his outlook from 2013. >> welcome back, ethan. >> how does the next year look to you? >> well, i think it's going to be a very slow start. i mean, this fiscal cliff discussion you're having right now illustrates why there's a high risk of a messy outcome with both parties fluilibusteri here. i think we'll start out with weak from the shock of the cliff and austerity measures and i think things will get better in the secretary half once we get past the initial shock, but it's going to be another choppy years. >> the bulls join us often here, ethan. their point is this is such an undervalued market and there's so much cash sitting out there that any deal would be sort of a relief for the markets and get corporations back to capital expenditur expenditures, back to hiring and maybe a bump in the economy. i sense that you don't fee
CNBC
Dec 31, 2012 3:00pm EST
&p looks attractive. the other thing is the policy mandate in places like europe believe it or not for the first time in a really long time they actually may be clearer than the u.s. >> chris, is there something about the fiscal cliff, deal or no deal, that makes you concerned about u.s. equities versus international ones? >> well, yes. but i think it's a relative concern. because i think risk assets around the world are attractively valued right now. but you're absolutely right. regardless of what sort of deal we get today or in the next three months, the fact of the matter is it will have an adverse impact next year. the question is is it going to be bad enough to throw the country into recession or not? we suspect not. and you're seeing today that it looks like a -- that both political sides have been able to find common ground on the tax issue which we think is pertinent in erm thes of the economic impact. but having said that, again, the policy response we think in europe ever since draghi has been in has been consistent and very conducive to risk markets going up. >
CNBC
Dec 3, 2012 3:00pm EST
at the u.s., throw if on a whiteboard, where else are you going to invest? you can't buy bonds, europe, emerging markets. you have to buy equities -- >> corporate bonds. >> maybe as part of that. but in terms of the whole total return funds you're seeing in these bond categories, you've had such rapid inflows, which is clearly a sign of a safety trade and psychological trade. they're not buying bonds based on fundamental but on fear. >> for yield. let's put aside all of this wrangling and let's say we get a deal done. we start to look at what that deal looks like. higher taxes, lower federal spending. right? i mean, when you look -- when you take away all of the fights and when you take away and go to the raw, what is left, you're talking about slower stimulus on a federal level because you've got higher taxes and because you've got lower spending from government. so, doesn't that hit earnings? >> no. here's why. we have found higher taxes are inconsequential with respect to stock market performance. stocks go up because the economy is recovering. if we were talking about the fiscal cl
CNBC
Dec 7, 2012 3:00pm EST
in the economy. certainly europe's not any help. what's happening in china and japan is not any help. then you add on top of it what's coming out of washington. i don't think you should get your hopes up about figuring it out before the end of this year. i think there's a pretty deept chance we go over the cliff and then try to sort it out in the beginning of the year. >> lovely. >> joe, when did 146,000 jobs become good? have we become so pessimistic -- have our expectations come so low we're cheering 146,000 when we should be well over 200? >> plus the downward revisions for the previous two months. >> although, those revisions were almost all in government. mandy makes a good point. 150,000 a month, which has been the average over the past is a months or so, is not great. if this was a normal recovery, we'd be growing at 4% instead of 2 on gdp. employment would be well over 250. however, the good news in today's report was if you look at the household survey, there was clearly a hurricane effect in these numbers. we might actually have printed over 200 absent hurricane sandy. i would argue
CNBC
Dec 12, 2012 3:00pm EST
gap closing, and i think we get much more conviction about a china recovery and europe exiting recession so those really support stocks. >> what are you basing it on when you say we'll see a recovery in the second half? what's going to spur that? >> one of the things we studied pretty deeply in the report is looking at durable goods spending. never in u.s. history have we spent this little on construction and housing starts in cap "x." even s&p cap "x" is still pretty close to the 2009 lows, and, you know, when you think about all of that, you have to be very contrarian in terms of sectors this year or next year. >> right. >> and the surprise i think is going to be basic materials. that's the worst per forming group of the last two years. really almost a historic underperformance of that sector, and, again, it's very died to gdp picking up. >> very quickly, tom, do you change your outlook for next year if we go off the fiscal cliff? >> yeah. i mean, if we have a cliff and a recession, there is no bull market. you know, bull markets end with recessions, so if we do fall off the
CNBC
Dec 13, 2012 3:00pm EST
. >> if you believe that, you know, we're going to be more like europe every year, i'd definitely be owning some gold. >> is that what you any? >> i don't -- i -- i have not liked gold as an inflation indicator throughout this whole run in part because i saw it as a flight to safety indicator more than anything else, not necessarily an inflation indicator. >> i agree. >> and it's hard for me to imagine that the equity market is trading for fear of inflation. every barometer i've looked at said this is a hawkish trade, a deflationary trade going on today, just the opposite. >> one more thing. i do agree that the reason i would never advocate selling stocks is because inflation is coming, and it's a great inflation adjustment instrument. >> all right. we'll leave it there. >> decoupling of gold and rick santelli works would have thunk it. >> thanks, guys. see you a little later. 40 minutes before the closing bell sounds for the day. market that is worse, down 100 points on the dow jones industrial average. as you can see, 96 points lower. >> someone just calling that, going back to the lows o
CNBC
Dec 21, 2012 3:00pm EST
at europe, it's recovering. you look at the way china is acting, it's recovering. a lot of the weakness that could come from the fiscal cliff may be picked up from overseas markets which have been a drag this year. maybe you see a flipping of that in 2013. >> it's interesting that you are looking at the emerging markets. even though, yes, you're looking at higher growth rates than some of these outside the u.s. hot spots, they've come down quite a bit. does that slowdown in growth affect you? >> no question it's slowed down quite a bit. the big three things that have happened in 2012, only five days left, are things that didn't have. greece does not have an exit. citigroup had a 90% chance earlier this year. the biggest day of this jurn year was june 17th when they elected a moderate who did not try to pull greece out. and germany stepped up and gave them some money and that september the 6th, that was the european central bank. so you had china, maria, the united states and greece. none of them went off the cliff. maria, this is for you. our little christmas present for you, maria. >>
CNBC
Dec 26, 2012 3:00pm EST
to watch things in europe. the big day is the september 11th elections in germany and germany could be harder after the election. in the first half is the sent ceiling discussion and finally profits, personal income and production, if those can do better than the markets can lift but right now the view is for a nothing market from here till year end. once the seasonal increases go away, we could have tax increases rand spending cuts if we get a deal. why is that going on a headwind for the stock market? >> i think it will be. if the taxes go up, i think that's something that hurts consumer confidence. you've seen the retail sales in the last part of this season here, have sold off, and many people have said it's because of the fiscal cliff. >> kind of depressing when you say it's a nothing market between now and the end of 2013. how do you make money, if you want to see it's going to be a -- >> he knows rhyme going to say buy apple. it's up 20%, up 50% and some off a little bit. if it sells off, you'll have nice dividend stocks like ant anti--sizer, the subplatform of all of the sma
CNBC
Dec 28, 2012 3:00pm EST
of the issues, not really solve anything, kick the can down the road much like they do in europe and get your mild positive reaction going into the jobs data on friday. >> do you think we get a definitive move in this market one way or the other with some announcement out of washington, or is this market just so tired of all of the developments there? what do you think? >> well, there's still a risk-on trend, and if they kick the can down the road or actually come to some kind of compromise, that trend is intact, and you'll see going into the first few months of the year i believe very positive price action for all the equity indexs? >> what now, rick? what say you? what now? >> i liked dan greenhouse's comment. in a perverse sort of way. if there really is any austerity, you'll hear an ouch or some squawking or bellyaching which is the fiscal cliff. if we went over the cliff, they be we actually would have at least a touch of austerity, but nobody wants that. i contend, and i said this back in 2008, we're going to have to experience some pain. i don't think there's any way around it. it's ju
CNBC
Dec 24, 2012 12:00pm EST
're going to tour, next year is all about touring. we're going all over the world. back to eastern europe in march and then to asia and all across maybe australia and in the summer but it's all about touring and then maybe at the end of next year do another record. >> you're going into your tenth year of touring. you're going to do another 300 days? hey, chris -- >> i feel very lucky to be able to do it. you know, at the end of it what do you do? i just feel very lucky to be able to tour like i do. >> let's mention you're playing new york for the next three weeks. >> we do 21 nights. this is our eighth year in a row in new york. we don't have to get on an airplane. >> sold out at the blue note. two shows a night. 21 nights in a row. come down. shows are 8:00 and 10:30. there are usually a couple seats left because people can't make it to new york at the last minute but call the club or whatever. very, very famous legendary jazz club the blue note. >> usually room at the bar. >> there's always room at the bar. >> we'll see you in an hour for the closing bell. thanks so much. >> thanks, bob
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18